Literacy Series Post #4: Fast ForWord

March 26, 2013

Fast ForWord
A critical first step in CSLOT’s literacy program is Fast ForWord, from Scientific Learning, Inc. Fast ForWord is a computer-based program that that takes your child through a series of age-appropriate, highly motivating computer games, building skills necessary for learning to read. Many speech- and language-impaired children have difficulty with the auditory perceptual task of discriminating between speech sounds. To remediate these foundational discrimination problems, the Fast ForWord software slows down speech so the brain has more time to perceive the acoustic differences between the speech sounds. Playing the games at home for 8-12 weeks, supported by weekly parent consultations with CSLOT’s Fast ForWord specialist, your child will learn to discriminate speech sounds, and as he progresses, the software gradually returns to natural sounding speech.

Fast ForWord Language v2

The Language series develops listening accuracy, phonological awareness, and language structures and moves elementary students who are reading below grade level toward grade level reading skills.

Fast ForWord Language to Reading v2

The Language to Reading series emphasizes the link between spoken and written language to guide young students to become proficient grade level readers.

For more information about Fast ForWord, please visit the Fast ForWord page on our website by clicking here.

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Literacy Series Post 3: Speech Sound Disorders

March 19, 2013

Speech Sound Disorders: Articulation and Phonological Processing

A speech sound disorder (SSD) is a broad classification of disorders affecting a child’s (and sometimes adult’s) ability to communicate. Though all children make mistakes when learning new words and sounds, a disorder occurs when the child reaches a certain age and is still making certain mistakes. A speech-language pathologist (SLP) can help treat and possibly cure SSDs. The two main types of SSDs are articulation and phonological disorders.

Articulation Disorders

Articulation disorders are characterized by substitution, distortion, omission or addition of sounds in words. A child with an articulation disorder will have difficulty learning how to physically produce certain sounds. One of the more common articulation problems is the inability for a child to produce the “r” sound. The “r” is often substituted with “w,” like saying “twee,” instead of “tree.” A lisp also is a common articulation distortion.

An SLP can teach a patient new ways to produce sounds (for example, changing the placement of the tongue when making certain sounds). Sounds in different words are practiced in repetition, until they become natural for the speaker.

Phonological Process Disorders

Phonological process disorder is marked by a set pattern of sound errors. A child with a phonological process disorder will have difficulties learning the sound system. He or she may not realize that certain different sounds have different meanings. A common example is replacing the “d” sound with a “g”; saying “dot,” for example, instead of “got.” Children with this disorder may be able to hear the sound distinction in other peoples’ voices, but be unaware when they make the distortion.

An SLP will design a program involving studying and repeating words that differ only by one sound to indicate how different sounds signify different meanings. The suggested exercises will generalize age-appropriate phonological patterns.

In many cases, the reason that speech sound disorders occur is unknown, but recent research has shown that weaknesses in phonological awareness and word reading demonstrated by children with SSDs could be at least partially explained by their difficulties with phonological representation, implicating the brain’s auditory processing system.

Many children outgrow the problem, but those who cannot learn to produce sounds correctly, or do not learn the rules of speech on their own, need intervention.  A speech evaluation by an SLP will help decide if the child if the child will outgrow the problem.  There are many factors which will help decide if a child is in need of therapy.  One important consideration is the child’s degree of unintelligibility and how it restricts him from communicating with his family and peers.  A very verbal child who is difficult to understand can often feel frustrated and may respond by withdrawing from the effort of communication.

At CSLOT, we believe it is critical for our Speech-Language Pathologists (SLPs)to provide interventions that comprehensively integrate training in speech perception, speech production, phonological awareness, phonics, and direct reading instruction.

Your child’s speech therapist will support your child’s auditory processing in the area of phonemic awareness by teaching your child how to play with sounds in words, manipulating and changing them in many ways, while speech therapy will show your child how to produce the speech sounds correctly.

To set up an evaluation for your child, please visit our appointment page.